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Posts Tagged ‘customer service’

LSW 9: Facebook First

March 25, 2013 Leave a comment

My authentic client, The Den, is located on Columbus State University’s Riverpark Campus, has a Facebook page that has sat dormant for quite a while. This is a unique situation, the page looks like someone just stopped posting. Because of this, I recommend the first social media platform to be restoring the Facebook page. As a part of the restoration process, I highly recommend that The Den’s Facebook page be reconfigured to be connected to Columbus State University’s Facebook Community. This change will more effectively aim any posts The Den makes at its target audience.

During the time that the Facebook page sat unused, The Den underwent significant changes and improvements; relocating and remodeling are the biggest changes. The Den has a new manager and a new attitude towards operations. The new environment is the opposite of the old one. The new Den is clean, bright, and inviting. The Den has a lot to be proud of and a lot of new news to share with their customers and followers. Since Facebook prioritizes posts that include pictures or links, I advise my client to use this information and re-enter the online conversation by making posts that include both posts and links. The Den should post two or three times a day, at times that are relevant to their client. For example, a mid-morning post of the daily menu could be done with a link to Campusdish.com; an Aramark run website where Columbus State University’s daily menus are already beautifully displayed. Food is visual, so The Den should not be shy about posting pictures. A good picture of the daily special can make a huge impression to the online discussion about campus dining. Because The Den has sat silent for a while, I recommend they start out slowly, with the intent of getting people’s attention before they move forward. The ultimate goal for The Den would be success using social media.
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LSW 7: Campus Dining at The University of West Georgia

My authentic client is The Den which is located downtown at Columbus State University’s Riverpark Campus; henceforth CSU. For my second organization to analyze, I chose the University of West Georgia; henceforth UWG. This school is an excellent example as their Foodservices Department is identical to CSU’s; both are operated by Aramark, the global professional services corporation. Like CSU, the Auxiliary Services Department oversees the foodservices operator. This is pertinent information. After a long and exhaustive internet search, I discovered that UWG’s Auxiliary Services Department Facebook and Twitter pages are where social media posts related to campus dining are located; they seemed hidden. The importance of food to college students is legendary. Frankly, this discovery left me scratching my head.

The Facebook posts attempted to completely cover the Auxiliary Services Department. A strategy that lacked clear focus, and made the page seem like a catch-all. I could see that UWG did care about the traditional components of grammar in writing. The university’s posts were properly worded, punctuated, and expressed a complete thought. Basically, the few students that seemed to be aware of the dining hall posts used a combination of proper grammar and text-speak. Students tended to stay more conservative with the occasion emoticon or acronym. The posts made by UWG strive to inform the student body by including details about upcoming events, recipes, surveys, and questionnaires. I could not find evidence of the entertaining component of Orsburn’s social media equation. As far as the converting to business component, in this situation, it is a moot point; residential student customers are forced to purchase a meal plan.

I am leaving this investigation better informed but concerned. After comparing my authentic client, The Den at CSU, to UGA’s Bull Dawg Dining (LSW 6), and UWG, I discovered that only UGA’s Foodservices has an effective social media plan. An interesting fact to note, UGA is the only school amongst these three that insources campus dining; and they are obviously proud enough of their Food Services to advertise through social media.
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How Important is Grammar to Social Media Marketing?

February 19, 2013 Leave a comment

Social media has infinitely expanded the way language is used.  More than ever before, social media provides businesses the opportunity to join the online conversation and speak to the world.  As exciting as this opportunity is, before jumping straight into the conversation, businesses must first decide exactly how they want to present themselves.  For everyone, grammar seems to be a large part of the decision making process.  Since the world of social media is filled with jargon, text speak, emoticons, acronyms, odd grammatical substitutions and errors, the world of language can be quite confusing. 

 

Social media’s unique use of language creates an opportunity for the business to decide how it wants to be viewed within the context of the online conversation.  At this point it is important to note an important fact; social media’s free form language is not generally appropriate for businesses.  For the potential customer, the type of language a business uses can be a good indicator of the company’s operational standards.

 

On smallbusiness.yahoo.com, in her February 7, 2013 article, “Social Media Grammar Gaffes:  How to Embarrass Yourself Online-Part 2,” Amanda Clark writes about this very subject.  Amanda is surprised at the number of people that willingly massacre the English language on social media.  Additionally, she thinks the annihilations are due to people who are not proofreading or not caring.  She might be right, but no matter what, as the business world embraces social media, customers deserve a concise, properly spelled and punctuated answer.  Business relationships are fostered and grown on clarity, concision and trust.  Using proper grammar not only helps a business to say what it means it also shows customers that your business is serious about its business. 

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 http://smallbusiness.yahoo.com/advisor/social-media-grammar-gaffes-embarrass-yourself-online-part-021508515.html. 

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How Many Social Media Posts Does it Take?

February 5, 2013 Leave a comment

Among the foodservice companies that participate in social media, most seem to think one to four daily posts will adequately inform the social media world of the company’s core values. Momentus Media’s data on our WordPress blog’s resource page, advises up to twelve posts per day for any business. Many foodservice providers (restaurants, caterers, campus dining, etc..) appear to believe that one post of the daily menu/specials is all they need to do to effectively market their brand through social media. Wiley Cerilli, a contributor to HuffingtonPost.com and the CEO of SinglePlatform, reviewed five restaurants that successfully use social media marketing to showcase their products and services. In addition to regular posts, the restaurants that he analyzed used a variety of tactics to keep their old customers interested while simultaneously expanding their customer base; contests, games, and cooking classes are a few examples. According to Cerilli, an active social media presence, one that feels alive, will help restaurants grow. Cerilli’s approach is interesting to me in the ways that it mirrors the old mentality that a restaurant is a living entity that is meant to be nurtured and grown. (word count 189)

Authentic Client Project

February 5, 2013 Leave a comment

My Authentic Client Project will showcase the social media plan of The Den, a Columbus State University dining facility that is located on the downtown Riverpark Campus. The Den does currently have a facebook page and a twitter presence, but neither are maintained on a regular basis. In fact, the last time there was a facebook post was early January and the last tweet sent out was mid January. In addition, The Den also has a presence on campusdish.com. Interestingly, it is Columbus State University’s College of the Arts that most consistently uses social media to promote The Den through their facebook page. Additionally, the university dining service mascot, Chef Cody, occassionally uses social media to mention The Den. Surprisingly, the foosdervice operator at Columbus State University, Aramark Corporation (headquartered in Phildelphia, PA), does not seem to have a consistent social media marketing plan either.

The Den appears to be the victim of a social media marketing that is scattered but ineffective as no one seems to control a master plan. Instead, The Den seems to rely on well intentioned volunteers to spread the message about their foodservices. (word count 188)

Social Media Speaks

January 23, 2013 Leave a comment

I must admit that I am not an expert on the subject of social media. To be honest with you, I have hardly any experience at all, but when I do participate in social media, I find the language patterns fascinating. Culture has always fascinated me. One of the ways I see the internet is as an opportunity to view culture and learn.

Social media speaks its own language that is unique in its composition and in its lack of rules. It definitely seems like the language of social media has an anything goes attitude when it gives its speakers the ability to combine letters, words, symbols, acronyms, tongues, punctuation marks, and the like. Surprisingly, this casual, free-form communication is effective. People understand each other and are having an ongoing online conversation.

To many, this is a tactic that dumbs-down our language. To me, this is sheer genius. Manipulating a language, bending it to meet your own personal rules, is the work of a person who truly understands that language. When we talk about the language of social media we talk about a whole community of people who have the same ability to manipulate the language. This yields a fascinating, no-holds-barred style of communication and a voice that is representative of the world. Word Count 213.

Rhetoric and Humor in Social Media

January 22, 2013 Leave a comment

Analyzing the type of language and content that people post on SM can correlate directly to Aristotle’s five canons of rhetoric: Invention, style, arrangement, delivery, and memory. Through invention, we post opinions that are debatable; through style, we could choose to provide a link to a source to back up our findings or include a picture; the arrangement is how we would order our thoughts to best articulate our language/message; through delivery, we would utilize the caps lock key and emphasize certain punctuation marks (such as the exclamation point, question mark, dashes, and the other symbols that are coupled on the numbers row), and take advantage of the enter key to form new paragraphs to create emphasis; and with memory, we would be more than familiar with the material we are conveying as to create ethos (credibility) with the audience.

In looking more closely at the types of language and words used in customer service, one could find humor in the message. This style is harder to achieve without destroying ethos, because money is serious. And when people feel their money and time aren’t being taken seriously, that said company’s credibility goes out the window. While humor can be conveyed through customer service in SM, it requires a degree of finesse, a refined technique, and the customer’s best interest in mind. Integrating some of the customer service jargon (customer loyalty, customer expectations, customer satisfaction, mission statement, support staff (instituteofcustomerservice.com/1848/all/3/Glossary)) isn’t as hard as remaining trustworthy to one’s customers and slipping in a punch line at the same time.

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